St Augustine's College founded in Raleigh, North Carolina

Date: 
Mon, 1867-10-14

The founding of St. Augustine’s College in Raleigh, N.C., in 1867 is celebrated on this date. It is One of over 100 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in America.

It was established by the Episcopalian clergy for the education of freed slaves. Over time, this Black school has become one of the country's most highly respected private, accredited, coeducational institutions. The college's liberal arts department includes programs in business, computer science, teacher education, the natural sciences, mathematics, allied health, interdisciplinary studies, urban, social/international studies, theater and film, adult education, community development, communications, and military science, a required course for all members of the College's distinguished Army ROTC division.

Recently the College's annual enrollment has grown to 1,400 students, about half from North Carolina, the remainder from 37 states, the District of Columbia, the U. S. Virgin Islands, Jamaica and 30 foreign countries. St. Augustine’s consists of nearly 100 dedicated men and women, all capable teachers and scholars. Their main campus is over 55 acres with 37 facilities, three of which, its Chapel, St. Agnes Hall and Taylor Hall, are registered historic landmarks. St. Augustine's was the first HBCU in the nation to have its own on-campus commercial radio and television stations: WAUG-AM750 and WAUG-TV68, Cable Channel 20. They provide a strong liberal arts base for all of its students with flexibility.

They enable their students to make educational and career choices consistent with widening opportunities and the rapidly changing conditions of society too. While technical skills are highly prized to guarantee students a meaningful role in the marketplace, St. Augustine's also assists students in developing enriched perspectives to deal competently with an increasingly complex, interactive global society.

Some of St. Augustine's more than 10,000 living alumni are: North Carolina State Auditor, the Hon. Ralph Campbell, Jr., class of 1968, the first African-American elected to that position in this state; George Williams, class of 65, internationally acclaimed track and field coach; Ruby Butler DeMesme, ’69, former assistant secretary of the Air Force (ret.) for manpower, installations and environment; and Hannah Diggs Atkins, ’43, first African-American woman elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives (1968-1980).

Reference:
Black American Colleges and Universities:
Profiles of Two-Year, Four-Year, & Professional Schools
by Levirn Hill, Pub., Gale Group, 1994
ISBN: 0-02-864984-2